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BIO 3176 Animal Behaviour

An introduction to the study of animal behaviour; evolution and adaptive value of behaviour. The field of animal behaviour is vast and I will focus on the ecological and evolutionary aspects.  The emphasis in this course will be on the ultimate causes and effects of animal behaviour (why these behaviours are adaptive), rather than the proximate mechanisms by which behaviours are elicited (neural or hormonal mechanisms and controls, for example).

Classes

Tues 830-10 in Vanier (VNR) 3035
Friday 10-1130 in VNR 3035

Office Hours

Thursday 130-230 in GNN284
Please email me to set up an appointment at another time if you are not available to drop in during office hours.

Communication

Occasionally, I will be required to contact you by email with some info about the course.  Please note that it is your responsibility to check your uottawa email regularly and to respond within a reasonable delay.  You may consult these regulations surrounding email contact at uOttawa here.

Discussion Groups

DGD1 Mon 10-11 in LPR 154
DGD2 Mon 1130-1230 in HGN 305
DGD3 Mon 4-5 in TBD
DGD4 Wed 1-2 in GSD 307
DGD5 cancelled
DGD6 cancelled

Evaluation

Midterm 1 (Tuesday October 17): 15 or 20%
Midterm2 (Friday November 10): 15 or 20%
DGD presentation: 15%
DGD participation: 10%
Final Exam (2017 Date TBD): 40%

The exams will mostly concentrate on higher levels of interpretation of the lecture material, such as comparisons and contrasting, as well as interpretations, analysis and synthesis, rather than listings of terms or regurgitation of facts.

N.B. There will be no make-up writings for the midterms if you must miss one for a valid reason (proof required), otherwise your marks will be redistributed to the other midterm and final.

The practice version of Midterm #1 is now posted online here.  Good luck with your studies!

Importantly, you will be expected to communicate your learning from this course in class and on the exams without needing to rely on examples.  What that means is that you will be expected to be able to describe or explain the fundamental ecological and evolutionary principles behind how and why animals behave the way the do, when they do.  For more information on this process of teaching and learning Animal Behaviour through exemplification, please have a look at our recent manuscript published on a study of this approach.

Please see the Undergraduate Guide to Success for more information on what to expect in order to perform optimally on one of my exams.

Textbook

Alcock, J. Animal Behavior, 10th edition. Sinauer Press.

animalbehavior10

This text is available at the University Bookstore and Agora (both new and used copies are available) and at many online bookstores.

Previous editions of this text can be used if you find a used copy but it will be your responsibility to verify how they differ and to have read all required segments. Likewise, there are many other good texts on Animal Behaviour that you are welcome to use but again, you must make sure that the required material is adequately covered.

Lectures

The order of the lectures will more or less follow that of the textbook*, and each topic will be discussed over approximately 1.5 – 2 classes.  Students can get a head-start on their required readings, as the lectures will follow the order below.

I have also posted Key Words of interest arising from the readings and the lectures.  These are provided for you to allow you to familiarize yourself with the appropriate terminology of the field of Animal Behaviour and to provide you with a study guide for words that you should know how to define, explain and use in your lexicon while discussing these topics. These Key Words are the terms used when discussing the biology of Animal Behaviour so you will want to start using them, as they will be a necessary part of a complete exam answer, for example.  You may also use the lists of Key Words as items from which you may build concept maps that tie the various notions in the field together.

*As you will notice, Topics 2-5 have moved to the back of the newest edition of the textbook.  These chapters deal with an introduction to the mechanistic underpinnings of the production and timing of behaviours.  I will, however, cover these later textbook chapters during the first part of the course in order to present a foundation of the mechanistic (or proximate) causes of animal behaviour, in order to focus more intently on the functional (or ultimate) causes of behaviour.

Topic 1
Introduction (Chapter 1):
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 2
The proximate and ultimate causes of behaviour (Chapter 10)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 3
The development of behaviour (Chapter 11)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 4
The neural control of behaviours (Chap. 12)
Notes notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 5
The hormonal organization of behaviours (Chap. 13)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 6
The evolution of altruism and sociality (Chapters 2&3)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 7
The evolution of communication (Chapter 4)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 8 
The evolution of surviving and feeding behaviour (Chapter 5)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 9
Choosing where to live (Chapter 6)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 10
The evolution of reproductive behaviour (Chapter 7)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 11
The evolution of mating systems (Chapter 8)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 12
The evolution of parental care (Chapter 9)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
Topic 13
The evolution of human behaviour (Chapter 14)
Notes in 3 slides or 6 slides
Key Words
 

I will have posted a .pdf file of each lecture’s notes in 2 formats (3 slides/page and 6 slides/page).  You should download the file and print out a copy to bring to class or use them for note-taking on your personal computer.

The goal of providing these notes is to allow students some relief from note-taking and permitting them to listen to and to better integrate the lecture material.  The slides notes are NOT complete, however, and students will be required read the textbook and to attend lectures in order to fill in the missing information.

Usually, the information contained on the slides relates to higher levels of organization in the learning process (context and interpretation), as opposed to simply learning lists, names and examples.

Discussion Group Information

Participation in the discussion groups is mandatory.  During these sessions, you will have an opportunity to delve deeper into some aspects of the material that is broached during the lectures.

This will involve either watching certain episodes of the wonderful and fascinating nature documentary hosted by David Attenborough, Trials of Life.  You will also be discussing articles on the behaviour of humans.

This latter exercise is meant to give students a glimpse into a) the fundamental research conducted to help us understand elements of Animal Behaviour, c) to recognize that we are animals ourselves and our behaviours are governed by the same ecological and evolutionary forces that have shaped all other animals and c) to develop students’ skills and reading, analyzing and interpreting manuscripts in the primary literature.

For more information on the critiquing of scientific articles, please consult my Undergraduate’s Guide to Success (available at the uOttawa bookstore)…. or you can view that chapter online here.

As we want to have a little bit of a discussion about the videos and that they are 5o minutes long each, we will not be able to view them in their entirety.  

The DGD student presentations will be conducted in groups of two (generating a single mark for the team) on an animal behaviour subject of your choice, illustrating the ecological and evolutionary contexts for the evolution of the behaviour in question.  The presentations will be 8 minutes long (5 per DGD) and constructed using information from the primary literature.  Please coordinate your topic choice and outline with the TA.

Your joint mark (per team of two) will be in part based on your scientific communication (contextualizing the topic, interpreting hypotheses and results) and in part on your presentation skills (verbal communication, slideshow effectiveness, storyline layout).  Students must build their talk using research found in the primary literature (citing several works on the topic) and effectively present it to an audience of their expert peers. At 8 min each, there is no time for dawdling so students must ensure that their story is concise and well rehearsed.

In order to be as fair as possible to all groups, each presentation must be handed in to your TA on the 1st day of presentations for each DGD section.  Please make sure that your file is compatible with the PC system and bring your presentation in both .ppt and .pdf (one slide per page) on a USB key.

You will have to confirm your presentation topic by your DGD session in Week 4 (Oct. 2-6) at the latest, justified with at least 2 scientific articles from the primary literature on the topic that were published by different authors (a 10% penalty per day will apply to tardy decision making).  If your topic has already been chosen by another group, you will have ONE week to come up with a new one so it is best to start thinking about this ASAP.

There is extensive information in the Undergraduate Guide to Success on how to give effective oral presentations to various different audiences and a section on the DOs and DON’Ts of presentation preparation and delivery that you can view online here. The evaluation form for the DGD presentations can be viewed here.  This is the marking scheme that will be used by the TA so it may be useful for you to consult it and to make sure that your presentation will satisfy all the expected criteria.  

Lastly, we have added another component to this assignment in the hopes that it will help to contribute to your learning experience.  The presentations are going to be filmed and you will be given a copy of your video to view (other students will not get access to your video).  After having watched your video, you will be asked to respond to it and your evaluation through a short survey and this will constitute half (5%) of your DGD participation mark.  I hope that you will find that by reviewing your presentation after having given it, you will learn a lot about how you appear to others and will provide a valuable insight into the effectiveness of oratorical and other presentation skills.

Good luck!

Week 1 (Sept.11-15):
Introduction to the discussion group and
introductions of the TA and the group members.
Film: Trials of Life by David Attenborough,
Growing up (Episode #2).
Discussion on the adaptive themes in the video.
Week 2 (Sept. 18-22):
Paper discussion: Production and appreciation
of humour as sexually selected traits
Download .pdf
Week 3 (Sept. 25-29):
Film: Trials of Life by David Attenborough,
Living together (Episode #7).
Discussion on the adaptive themes in the video.
Week 4 (Oct. 2-6):
Paper discussion: MHC-dependent mate choice
in humans
Download .pdf
Week 5 (Oct. 9-13):
Film: Trials of Life by David Attenborough,
Fighting (Episode #8).
Discussion on the adaptive themes in the video.
Week 6 (Oct. 16-20):
Film: Trials of Life by David Attenborough,
Courting (Episode #11).
Discussion on the adaptive themes in the video.
Week 7 (Oct. 23-27):
Fall Reading Week
Week 8 (Oct. 30 – Nov. 3):
Paper discussion: Preference for symmetry in
faces change across the menstrual cycle
Download .pdf
Week 9 (Nov. 6-10):
Film: Trials of Life by David Attenborough,
Friends and Rivals (Episode #9).
Discussion on the adaptive themes in the video.
Week 10 (Nov. 13-17):
Presentations
Week 11 (Nov. 20-24):
Presentations
Week 12 (Nov. 27 – Dec. 1):
Presentations
Week 13 (Dec. 4-6):
Presentations overflow
 

Want to hear what previous students are saying anonymously about this course? Below are some testimonials from previous BIO3176 students :

  • My favourite class thus far!  I really enjoyed your teaching once again and will be taking more of your classes.
  • The whole course was interesting.  Animal Behaviour taught/showed me to be able to apply concepts rather than have an assortment of random facts memorized.
  • I like Dr. Brown’s impersonations and demonstrations because they are entertaining and make the material easy to remember
  • Easily one of the best courses I’ve ever taken!
  • I really enjoyed this course and your style of teaching.  I also thought that the emphasis on being able to communicate rather than memorization was important.  While I still have to work on that, I have learned a great deal from this course both about the material and on being a student in biology in general.
  • I really enjoyed this class, it’s taught me so much about behaviour and I feel as though the information that I’ve acquired in this course is very applicable and crucial to know.
  • This was probably one of my favourite subjects at university.
  • I liked learning Animal Behaviour because it encourages critical thinking and not just regurgitation of information
  • Amazing course, so interesting and really well delivered.  Thanks!
  • Great class, fabulous prof :)
  • Great course, one of my favourites.  You’re a great teacher who teaches the concepts well.  Also you are passionate and energetic which make learning more enjoyable.
  • Dr. Brown you have taught me a lot and this was by far my favourite class I’ve taken in university.
  • I like that it isn’t about memorizing material and spitting it back verbatim.  But it’s rather about understanding and explaining why behaviours are the way they are.
  • My favourite thing about learning Animal Behaviour is being able to apply the themes we have learned to things that we can observe on a regular basis.  It is always fun conversation starter, and is really applicable to my other courses as well.
  • I enjoy your lecture style.  The website is well organized and easy to navigate, thanks!  DGDs are very helpful and interesting.  Thank you for putting a sample midterm.
  • I have been waiting since first year to take a course like this.  The material is something that I am very interested in on top of that.  I was happy to know you would be teaching it because I very much enjoyed your teaching style in Pesticides and the Environment last year.  The textbook is excellent and I love that the lectures follow the order.  I felt the exam (midterm, since final has yet to be written) was very fair and closely followed what was taught in class.  I also love the DGD sessions!  David Attenborough documentaries are my absolute favorite ( <3 Planet Earth and Life series!).
  • In summary, AWESOME! Thank you for inspiring me to learn more about this subject! It’s great to have such a passionate professor.  I hope I’m able to have the same level of passion and enthusiasm for my students (I sent in my application to teacher’s college this past month > keep your fingers crossed !! :o))
  • This has been my 2nd favourite class in university, as well as my 2nd best organized/structured class (sorry, Ecology with Kerr and Animal with Houseman went for 1st place respectively).  But this class was really excellent. I love the organization, the random facts I now know about animals and your evaluation style (minus the combined mark for the presentation).  I also REALLY appreciated the midterm solution review, I plan to use a similar method when I bdecome a teacher.  KEEP UP THE EXCELLENT WORK :o)
  • You took the place of my previous favourite prof, the main reason? Your as organized, as intelligent, and as stimulating but you don’t have any arrogance.
  • You’re a great speaker and make the content very interesting! Great course overall
  • I actually love the course! It’s one of my favourites out of all the courses I’ve taken.
  • The course so far has been very interesting! =)
  • Hymenoptera are really interesting!
  • This course is great! I find that the way Dr. Brown teaches is very captivating and the fact that he uses so many examples in class to describe the concept makes learning the material much easier. I am even more intrigued and interested in animal behaviour than I was before taking the class.
  • Lectures were animated and the textbook was only needed for specific definitions because other explanations during class were well fleshed out. DGD was lovely due to the videos of Mr. Attenborough and really supplemented the plethora of exampls given in class. Sample midterms and sample finals were useful abd very representative of the content in both the midterm and final respectively.
  • I love your teaching, just wished other profs would use it so I can get good at it. Deep thinking is a lot harder than regurgitating!
  • I enjoyed the course. I was nervous, I felt it might be a course with a rather large course load and would be hard to keep up, but I really enjoyed the subject matter. No boring lectures like other biology could have. You taught the course in a way that helped us grasp the main theories and terms and also used great examples in your teaching. I really had fun learning about animal Behvaiour. Thanks! Cheers!
  • I like the theories and analysis. It was fun to apply what we learned in the context of human behaviour and to find similarities and hidden reasons behind actions. The ability to apply cultural theory and other hypotheses outside the classroom as been my favourite outcome.
  • Find the process of developing a theory fascinating. Interesting to see the explanations without knowing all the answers as theories are deduced. Applicability to humans is also interesting.
  • the course is awesome (sad its over). Life is geeat (If I do well) and the unvierse is cool. Thank! Hope to take another of your courses.
  • Such an interesting course! Concepts are easy to grasp. Usiing only pictures on the slides and you personally talking and explaining the concept or idea helps not forgetting them!
  • Great course! Actually enjoyed studying for this. See you next semester
  • I found the course awesome and an interesting area of study
  • Darwinian puzzles! Interesting and fun to study reason behind such odd behavious. Cute animals!
  • This course has been the best taught and most interesting to me
  • Thanks for the course and the knowledge
  • inspires wonder
  • Great Course! Fun Class
  • My favourite thing about this class was your teaching and your dedication, you looked over all the midterms yourself to make sure they were marked well, not every professor would do that and I appreciate it. I look forward to having you for pesticides next semester.
  • Thanks for everything that was taught to me in this course/. Thank you for a great semester!
  • Prof is animated makes getting up more fun
  • Nothing to complain about the course contents or the way it present. The course is an excelllent comparative biology on the origin of behaviour between species and human.
  • I greatly enjoyed how the lecture material is conveyed. It is very clear concise and interesting. Good exmaples and videos. The interaction when questions were asked was very helpful. The DGDs were enjoyable but the first paper we read I didn’t find very clear or well written. Presentations were interesting and a good tool to learn how to analyze behaviour.
  • Thanks for a great class!
  • Interesting subject.  Videos are helpful to see aspects learnt in class in real life scenario.
  • This is probably the most I’ve learnt in a BIO class in my time being here.  I remember stuff from the first week and the content actually makes me excited to attend class.
  • Really interesting and entertaining lectures.  Going over ideal mid-term answers helps me to better prepare for the final.   P.s. you seem much more comfortable in English.  Your jokes and impersonations are much funnier.  It’s nice to see you in your natural habitat. :o)
  • Personally, I loved the class, it was interesting, easy to follow and the examples made things very clear.  Overall, loved the class, great prof, very enthusiastic.
  • Prof was very outgoing, which allowed this course to be more interesting than dull.
  • The course material was very interesting but at times can be a lot of information to take in.
  • I liked the fact that a sample midterm was posted so that students could prepare ahead of time fo rthe questions which would be asked.  Going over the midterm answers in class with the professor’s expectation for the answer and then having a student who received full marks read theirs was very helpful.  The DGDs were great for discussing topics and seeing the behaviours in video format instead of just words and pictures.
  • Course material is very interesting.  Professor teaches at a very good pace.  Material is straight out of textbook which is good.  I like how only figures are in the notes, it forces you to write.
  • This class is very interesting, the explanations are clear and the rhythm is at a good speed.  I feel that the midterm was fair and that the DGDs are useful as well as interesting.
  • The course is very interesting. It’s a lot of fun too.  The DGDs are very helpful.  The movies are great examples that illustrate the notions seen in class. The articles we read are also very useful, the fact that we interpret them together has helped a lot.  Surprisingly, there are very few other classes in the Faculty of Science that teach students how to properly interpret an article.  Keep it up!
  • The course material is very interesting, the professor is very entertaining and presents the material in a very fun and informative manner.  I really enjoyed the class overall.  No complaints, thank you for an amazing class.
  • Dr. Brown is an extremely effective professor who really tries to stimulate us and cement important concepts.  It say a lot about him that we not only had the opportunity to have a guest lecturer from UofT but that he gave his TAs the opportunity to give us a lecture and hone their skills.  The exam seemed a bit long so I personally rushed my final answers, but that might just be my own thing.  I am very impressed.  I wish his honour’s course was 9 credits instead of 3!
  • I find the course very interesting.  The subject matter is always conveyed very effectively and the use of other types of media helps with the learning.
  • I really enjoy this class, the lectures and the textbook is great.
  • I love everything about this class, the topics are interesting and your teaching makes it even more. I have nothing negative to say, you are the best teacher I have ever had.
  • This is the 3rd class I have taken with you as a prof and each class I can see the improvement in the teaching and organization of the class.  The DGDs are very interesting and useful. The subject matter of the course is interesting and is conveyed effectively.
  • You managed to teach in such a way that is conducive to see methodology of testing, which is a rare thing in profs often, so that’s a plus. Also, clearly put a lot of energy into lectures and as you clearly like the material and it shows.
  • Professor Brown is an excellent lecturer. Conveys material clearly. Class is extremely interesting.  Midterm was well-written and closely reflected what was discussed in class.  Textbook is a great choice, it follows almost exactly what we do in class.  Love this class!  Undergrad Guide to Success is really useful, I wish I had something like it in first year.
  • Nothing could be improved, perfect as is!
  • Very interesting course, professor is easy to listen to and communicates the subject and what he wants from students effectively.  I liked how it was a smaller class.
  • The professor was very enthusiastic about the teaching material which made it more interesting to learn.
  • I think you are awesome.  Really funny, very enthusiastic and you convey the subject matter effectively.
  • I liked the subject material. The teaching was excellent, very coherent and explained thoroughly.
  • Enjoyed the class very much.  Everything is laid out very nicely. I wouldn’t change anything :o)
  • LOVE this class. Subject material is so interesting and the flow from one topic to the next is logical and easy to follow.  Textbook is a great read and helps very much in clarifying things that are hazy when in lecture.  Your teaching is awesome – if I had one more year here I’d definitely take another course taught by you.  Keep it up. :o)
  • I love the course and really like the DGDs.  I find them helpful and fun.
  • Love the teaching methods, very interesting to listen to.  Interesting content/subject.

 

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